Too Late for Regrets For Sale at Boulder Book Store

Thanks to readily accessible self-publishing services and independent publishing companies, having your e-book featured on multiple online platforms is now a viable option for all aspiring authors. But there is something very exciting about seeing your work featured on a bookshelf–a physical bookshelf!

Thank you to Boulder Book Store in Boulder, CO for featuring Too Late for Regrets in their Recommended section. If you won’t be making your way to Boulder to ski this season, you can also order a physical copy on their website (link below)!

http://www.boulderbookstore.net/9780692229668

TLFR Bookshelf 2TLFR Bookshelf 3

Gardening Tips (On the Lighter Side)

The holiday season is a busy time. Sometimes it seems like everything that can go wrong will, so here are a few household tips and tricks to get you through the next couple of chaotic weeks ;).

Pruning mania:

Never allow an enthusiastic but inexperienced partner loose in the garden with a very sharp pair of hedge cutters. In a short time, an 8-foot shrub will be reduced to three twigs and a few tired-looking leaves.

Avoiding kitchen disasters:

Never go into the garden for just five minutes, leaving a pot of soup or stew boiling on the stove. Two hours later you will return to a smoke filled kitchen and a blackened pot with three pieces of slime stuck to the bottom. Here’s how to deal with this disaster.

Get down on your knees and apologize to the firefighters.

How to clean a blackened pot:

  1. Into the pot pour one cup of vinegar, one of toilet bowl cleanser, six denture cleaning pills, a pinch of curry powder, and several squirts of foaming shaving cream (unperfumed).
  2. Allow pot to stand for two days.
  3. Empty pot of liquids; pot still black.
  4. When no one is looking, throw pot into garbage.
  5. Buy new pot.

Getting the lawnmower ready for summer in eight easy steps:

  1. Assemble tools needed: wrench, oilcan, duct tape, screwdriver, and glue.
  2. Make sure gluggles and whatsits are free of dust. Brush off spiderwebs, including spider’s victim. This is a moth so large, machine guns could have been mounted on its wings.
  3. Oil fluger, being careful not to contaminate exstimbulator.
  4. Using wrench, tighten all dribbets, doodads, and dactyls.
  5. Fix loose handles (more or less) with duct tape and glue.
  6. Empty out fuel tank. Then refill.
  7. Order family and animals to stand well back (especially nervous cats).

Test by pulling cord 89 times. When five minutes away from hernia rupture, load the &*$#inh machine onto pick-up and take to a professional!

On Writing: Introducing a New Character

In Too Late for Regrets, I allowed Timothy and Elizabeth the luxury of developing their relationship in the first few chapters. Then I gradually developed Sir David Knightley’s character; the reader becomes aware of his importance in this story when he visits South Africa (page 97). Before flying back to the U.K., he sits in his hotel room thinking of Elizabeth. How he has adored her for so many years, his determination to marry her. He resolves to be more assertive with her when he next visits Hamilton City. Surely he will be able to persuade her and make his dream come true? When he meets Timothy and Elizabeth at the Botanic Gardens, it becomes obvious to him that this is no light romance. The sexual charge between Timothy and Elizabeth is palpable, and David mourns his loss.

“Elizabeth, why did you go for a walk that day?” (Page 112)

As he comes to know Timothy, David’s admiration for him increases. He admires Timothy’s keen intellect–his heroism and his devotion to his duties. When David realizes that Timothy is in danger of losing everything, he devises an ingenious plan to thwart the villain’s intentions.

David is an aristocrat and successful business man with a military background. He is a gentle man. What reader could fail to feel a fondness for him? Let me know what you think in the comments below!

On Writing: Villains in Novels

As in most novels, there is a villain in Too Late for Regrets. I don’t want to reveal the plot, so I’ll say no more. But the reader will spot this villain immediately. At the top of my list of  favorite villains in literature is Mrs. Danvers in Daphne du Maurier’s “Rebecca.”

Mrs. Danvers is the embodiment of evil; spiteful, manipulative, and filled with hatred for the second Mrs. de Winter. This innocent and inexperienced young girl is thrust into a situation which she is unable to handle. Mrs. Danvers, soft spoken and persuasive, convinces the girl that Max de Winter was obsessed with the beautiful Rebecca and is brokenhearted at her death. However, it is Mrs. Danvers who is obsessed with Rebecca. She wants to oust the young girl from Manderley, thus keeping Rebecca’s memory alive. Mrs. Danvers’ last tragic act destroys her and Rebecca’s legacy.

Can readers share with us their favorite villains?

On Writing: Character Background

As much as any author would love to include a character’s background in the finished draft of her novel, there is simply no time or page space to go on and on about the characters we have so carefully conjured. This is why blogs are so important; even after the novel has been published, the author can keep the spirit of the characters alive.

With his superior intellect and college degree, Timothy is soon promoted. He is fearless and is recognized for his natural leadership; his loyalty to his fellow officers is unswerving (see chapter 18, page 144).

But on his days off, he wastes his time in bars picking up unsuitable women who usually take advantage of his trusting and slightly gullible nature. His gentleness is part of his appeal, and also his weakness.

It is only when he meets Elizabeth and falls in love with her that this poor behavioral pattern changes. A whole new world opens up to him.

As for Elizabeth, the reader will learn more about her background in Chapter 12, which is titled “David in South Africa.” This chapter describes the suburbs of Johannesburg and the house she grew up in, as well as the reasons why she and her husband Hugh emigrated to the U.S.

Her beauty and outgoing personality captivates everyone who meets her. Is it any wonder that Timothy quickly falls in love with her?

Blogging and fan fiction have not only generated interest in existing novels, but helped to inspire new ones. What are some books or beloved characters that you have wanted to create backgrounds for? If you could write the prologue or epilogue for any book, which would it be? Discuss in the comments below!

Gardening in Too Late for Regrets: Sparkling White Flowers

In Too Late for Regrets, Elizabeth tells Timothy that she can’t make up her mind about something–should she plant white or pink petunias?

“White shows up so well at dusk…” – Too Late for Regrets, page 14

And not only at dusk do they show up well. Here are some exquisite white flowers that are sure to please gardeners and readers alike.

Had you been in Elizabeth’s position, which flowers would you have planted? If there are none below that you fancy, comment with the names your favorite nighttime flora!

White Alyssum

White Alyssum

Tanacetum (and an adorable Havanese puppy)

Tanacetum (and an adorable Havanese puppy)

White Roses

White Roses

White Cosmos

White Cosmos

White Candytuft

White Candytuft

Great Romances – A Memorable Love Affair

Moon tiger is a green coil which is placed in a saucer; when it is lit, the smoke repels mosquitoes. Moon Tiger is also the name of the 1987 novel by Penelope Lively; winner of the Booker Prize in the U.K. For those of you looking for an epic love story to read after finishing Too Late for Regrets, here is the first part of my Moon Tiger review.

An elderly woman lies dying. The story of her long life is told through her memories. The central section of the book is her heartbreaking love affair with Captain Tom Southern, a tank Commander.

The Time: 1941-1942

The Place: The Libyan desert where tank battles are being waged. The British tanks are pitted against those of the Germans under the command of the Desert Fox, Rommel.

Claudia Hampton is a journalist; she is beautiful, independent, and willful. She wangles a ride in a truck which is traveling through the desert to headquarters where she is to interview some of the top brass.

The truck becomes bogged down in the sand. Through the murk of a sandstorm, a jeep appears. The driver is Captain Tom Southern who offers to take her to headquarters. Sitting next to him and dazed from lack of sleep, Claudia naps. Through half-closed eyes, she observes his hands on the steering wheel.

Forty years later, as she lies dying, she can recall with clarity those hands. The author’s description of the carnage Claudia sees as the jeep ravels through the desert is vivid and unforgettable.

To Be Continued Next Week…